SILK
THE QUEEN OF NATURAL FIBRES 
Silk has become the queen of the natural fibers and its production is known everywhere, gracing elites all over the world. As one of the world’s oldest natural fibers, silk remains incredibly popular to this day. Nonetheless, that silk is a byproduct made from cocoon filaments of the domesticated silkworms, harvesting cocoon involves boiling the silkworm while it’s still alive. A process that eases the extraction and collection of silk, but at the expense of the silk moth that suffers serious harm and undergoes a cruel ending.
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THE PEACE SILK CICLE
Silk has become the queen of the natural fibers and its production is known everywhere, gracing elites all over the world. As one of the world’s oldest natural fibers, silk remains incredibly popular to this day. Nonetheless, that silk is a byproduct made from cocoon filaments of the domesticated silkworms, harvesting cocoon involves boiling the silkworm while it’s still alive. A process that eases the extraction and collection of silk, but at the expense of the silk moth that suffers serious harm and undergoes a cruel ending.
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  1. The female Philosamia ricini after copulation lays about 300-500 eggs in cluster

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ALONG THE SILK ROAD 
UNDER THE MULBERRY TREE

2,640 B.C.: On a delightful spring morning in my royal garden, the fresh scent of blossoms stimulates all senses and touches my imaginations. The sweet fragrance of lush green trees and citrus fruits in the delight of endless landscapes invigorates my body and spirit. A rustling catches my attention. What are these precious creatures? Glistening amber in my beloved mulberry tree? Slowly getting closer, the glistening amber happen to be a multitude of little worms, silkworm caterpillars, feeding on the mulberry leaves and spinning cocoons. Such extraordinary scene. 

 

Some days elapsed since the Chinese empress Si-Ling-Chi made the intriguing discovery of the silkworm caterpillars in the trees of her royal garden. Cherishing great expectations, she returns with the intend to spend the morning under the mulberry tree over her best loved green tea, reading books and unwind to the noises of nature. Lost in deep thoughts she noticed something bobbling on the bottom of her brew. It was the chrysalis of a silkworm which had fallen from the branches above. What happens next was a miracle, a wonder of nature. The hot water softened the cocoon and unwind in luminous long filament. Upon close consideration and consultation with her ladies of the court, Si-Ling-Chi realized that the filaments twisted together would create yarn strong enough for weaving. Many rousing nights Si-Ling-Chi only dreamed of her new garments entirely made from these fine threads, shimmering splendor like millions of crystal stars in the dark sky. Imaginations which would eventually become reality. 

 

The secret of the silk generation has been kept by the royal family for millenniums. Even if the silk material was of large desire by nobles and kings of foreign lands, the source of the shiny thread, was not releveled for over 2500 years. 

FROM CHINA TO INDA 

It is the start of the seventh century. Many years after Si-Ling-Chi encountered the precious silkworm in her beverage. The Tang Dynasty rules China and endows a glistering historic period, the golden age of Chinese arts and culture. The age of political and economic height, but also the end of China’s monopoly over silk. 

In a warm summer night, on the branch of the southern silk road in Khotan, the postprocessing of the biggest wedding of the year was still in full swing. A celebration that will never be forgotten. The end of an era. Vijaya Jaya, the king of Khotan convinced his Chinese bride to smuggle seeds of the mulberry tree and cocoons, veiled in her headdress on her way to Khotan. Along the silk road, the very wisdom of the silkworm, and its spinning procedure penetrated to India, Japan and shortly after to many other countries.